To which European countries do Europeans migrate?

 


Migration is a huge topic in Europe and I wanted to know where people go, when they leave the country they grew up in. Luckily Eurostat has some Data about that.

There is the problem of huge population differences between the countries, so I wasn’t able to just use the absolut numbers. So I created to graphs. Once it show the migrant-population¬† relative to the host country and once relative to their origin country.


I created the graphs with the help of R and Ggplot. Code of the second graph:

ggplot(mig1,aes(y=Host,x=Origin,fill=sharehostpop))+
 geom_raster()+
 theme_gray()+
 coord_equal()+
 scale_fill_distiller(palette="YlOrRd", direction = 1,na.value=NA,trans='log1p')+
 theme( 
 axis.text.x=element_text(angle = 45, hjust=.1),
 legend.position = "bottom")+
scale_x_discrete(position="top")+
 scale_y_discrete(limits=names(table(droplevels(mig1$Host)))[length(names(table(droplevels(mig1$Host)))):1])+
 labs(y="Host-Country",x="Origin-Country",fill="Share of Population in Host-Country (%)",
 title="Biggest groups of European immigrants in Europe (2017)",caption="Note: Missing countries had no Data avaible or were so small, that they distored the scale.
 Source: Eurostat")

A dot-map of Europe

This map is a more leaning on the aesthetic- then data-side. The size of the dots correlates with the size of the population in that place. The color has no meaning and is just there to look nice. For the division of places I used the NUT3 standard which is quite useful, but has its problems if you use it to compare countries. Continue reading “A dot-map of Europe”